totof
  • totof
  • Newbie Topic Starter
14 years ago
Anyone ever experiment scan reading from a samples (radio off plate, inner side glove box door, ashtray door...) to retrieve a color ?
I wonder how it works further... is it a comparison with existing car colors chart or is it a way to come back to bases ??? thanks...
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stickman
14 years ago
Hi,

I had a mexican beetle that we could not idetify the colour code. The petrol flap was sent away and scanned. The colour match was spot on.

Not sure how it works though.
totof
  • totof
  • Newbie Topic Starter
14 years ago
thanks for your participation but well it doesn't answer to my question
pre67vw
14 years ago
totof wrote:

thanks for your participation but well it doesn't answer to my question



It answered your first question pretty well I thought... :roll:
Rob Amos
Happiness is a stock VW
Ovalbug
14 years ago
pre67vw wrote:



It answered your first question pretty well I thought... :roll:



:lol:
'63 Karmann Ghia RHD
'72 1302LS Karmann Cabrio RHD
Etzhold1
14 years ago
The only thing that I know, that it is expencive !
It can take hours before they mixed the matching color !
If you have a paint code, that will help, but they have to mix paint to get as close as possible to the original paint(sample) !scann, mixing, spraying, drying and again !
Thats why it cost 100 euro for 1 liter paint !
Guido

djkeev
14 years ago
totof wrote:

Anyone ever experiment scan reading from a samples (radio off plate, inner side glove box door, ashtray door...) to retrieve a color ?
I wonder how it works further... is it a comparison with existing car colors chart or is it a way to come back to bases ??? thanks...



Hi,
Not sure what you are asking here.
Most frequently color scanning will work and the match will be good.
Problems arise down the road a spell as the paint ages.
The scan using light analyzes the color spectrum and comes up with a formula for achieving that particular color. The odds are high, very high that the pigments used to achieve this color are way different than VW used back in the day. These different pigments will age and weather differently than the original pigments will and the color will literally change as time passes.
Different lights will change colors and how they reflect a given light. What looks like a perfect match in daylight could look horrendous under a light at night.
Even factory paint and codes will not age exactly the same as the original paintwork on a car. Even with newer cars using the same formulas. Who made the pigment, what was the temperature upon application, what was the humidity and what speed dryers were used, percentage of thinners used, etc.
Professional shops can barely make a 100% color match, it is much more unlikely the amatuer can do any better.
You'll need to be happy with very very close color but don't expect perfect in all lights and for the long haul.

Dave
"If you don't have the time to do it right the first time, when will you find the time to do it over again later?"
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